telford mind 250-253

Calm Cafe in Telford

A new evening service is starting on Monday 27th January 2020, in partnership with Telford MIND and Hub on the Hill Sutton Hill Telford, Wellbeing Madeley Community Cafe Telford & Wrekin CVS, Meeting Point House and A Better Tomorrow CIC.

The Cafés will offer support for people experiencing emotional / mental health issues. Staff from a range of organisations will be available to listen, signpost and support either on an informal basis by dropping in for a cup of tea, or on a one to one basis using a quiet, secure space at the Café.

These services will take place at:

  • Mondays, 6 pm- 9 pm at The Hub on the Hill, Southgate, Sutton Hill TF7 4HG 
  • Wednesdays and Thursdays, 6 pm- 9 pm at Meeting Point House, Southwater Square, Telford TF3 4HS and 
  • Wednesdays, 6 pm- 9 pm at Madeley Well-being Cafe, (TWCVS) 32, High Street, TF7 5AR

You can access the Cafés as a “drop in” but if you require further information please call 07434 869248 or email [email protected]

Calm Cafe

healthwatch telford and wrekin

Help more people to “SpeakUp2020″ for better care in 2020

Healthwatch Telford and Wrekin are running a campaign from the 13 – 19 January called #SpeakUp2020, encouraging people to share their views about how Health & Social Care Services can be improved in Telford & Wrekin.

They know people want to provide feedback about health and care, so if they know your views they can be used to change services. By getting involved in #SpeakUp2020, you can help support patient involvement in the local area and get valuable insight into what people want from local services.

How can you get involved?

Healthwatch Telfotrd & Wrekin are asking people to complete a short survey about the top health and care issues in Telford & Wrekin. 

You can find the survey here: https://www.healthwatch.co.uk/speak-2020

Shrop CCG

Proposals for a new Health Organisation for Shropshire, Telford and Wrekin

News from our partners the Clinical Commissioning Groups

Shropshire residents are being encouraged to come along to a series of pop-up events to find out more about proposals for a new health organisation for Shropshire, Telford and Wrekin.

The pop-up events are being organised by the county’s health bosses to give people the chance to voice their opinions on a new health proposal.

The proposal is to replace the two existing Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) and form a Single Strategic Commissioning Organisation for the whole county.

Shropshire CCG and Telford and Wrekin CCG are currently the two NHS organisations responsible for planning, paying for and monitoring most local health services in the county.

The pop-up events are being set up to provide an opportunity for local people to come and talk to the CCG teams about the changes they are planning, ask any questions, and give their feedback.

Each pop-up runs between 10 am and 12 midday, with no appointment necessary:

  • Wednesday 29 January, 2020 – Park Lane Centre, Telford, TF7 5QZ
  • Thursday 30 January, 2020 – Oswestry Library, SY11 1JN
  • Thursday 30 January, 2020 – Tesco Extra, Wrekin Retail Park, TF1 2DE
  • Friday 31 January, 2020 – Meeting Point House, Telford, TF3 4HS
  • Friday 31 January, 2020 – Whitchurch Library, SY13 1AX
  • Monday 3 February 2020 – Darwin Shopping Centre, Shrewsbury, SY1 1PL
  • Friday 7 February, 2020 – Ludlow Library, SY8 2PG.

David Evans, Joint Accountable Officer for Shropshire, Telford and Wrekin CCGs, said:

“These pop-up events will provide a great opportunity for us to find out the views of our residents, to have a chat about the proposals and to discuss why we think they provide the best route forwards.

“We are faced with big challenges in Shropshire, such as a rapidly growing elderly population as well as significant deprivation in areas of the county which means we need to be able to respond in the best possible way to these changing needs.

“I would like to urge everyone to come along to one of our events to find out more about the proposals and to ask any questions. There is no appointment necessary and you can come along at any time between 10 am and 12midday.”

Dr Julian Povey, Chair of Shropshire CCG, said:

“These events will provide an excellent opportunity to speak with local people and hear their views to help us shape the proposals for the future CCG.

“This proposal is really about the way the two CCGs work operationally, so we expect there will be little impact on patients. For example, local people will still carry on going to their regular GP practice.”

Dr Jo Leahy, Chair of Telford and Wrekin CCG, said:

“We believe a brand new organisation could provide a number of benefits for local people by streamlining and removing duplication which will lead to improvements in providing services.”

For further information please contact the Shropshire CCG Communications and Engagement Team at [email protected]

Telford & Wrekin 250-253

Travel Assistance Consultation-Telford and Wrekin

The objective of all Telford and Wrekin travel assistance polices is to enable people to have more choice and control by accessing general travel services where possible.

The Council’s ambition for vulnerable adults, children and young people lie at the heart of their priorities, ‘the right support at the right time to support independence’. The Council’s current transport service is a traditional model that encourages dependency.

The Council has reviewed its travel assistance policies, with a focus on: 

  • explaining the statutory duties and what parents, carers and adults can expect from the service, and signposting for those not eligible for these services so that we offer “Something for everyone”
  • encouraging independence, for example by expanding travel training
  • solving problems and promoting social responsibility by offering a range of travel assistance options
  • clearly explaining how decisions are made around eligibility for travel assistance 
  • being clear about the appeals process and for services the Council may charge for
  • offering any available spare seats on school buses to those who are not eligible but who may benefit from them for a contribution.

The first phase of the two-stage consultation finished on Friday 15 November 2019. 

This phase included travel assistance that affected Home to School Travel up to the age of 16 including travel assistance to attend specialist nursery provision. 

The second phase of the consultation is now open until 3 February. This phase includes Post 16 educational travel assistance and adult social care travel assistance.

To be kept informed sign up to our E-mail Newsletter.

We are seeking your views on policies including opportunities to deliver services in a different way. .

It is important to be clear that these proposals refer to travel assistance provided by the Council and not those provided by third parties such as schools or colleges. 

Here are the proposed policies: 

View more information on the proposed changes.

You can tell us your views by clicking on this link and completing our questionnaire online or click here: https://telford.researchfeedback.net/wh/s.asp?k=157830956446

If you would like the questionnaire in an alternative format or have questions about the consultation please email [email protected] or call us on 01952 384620.

This consultation closes on Monday 3rd February 2020

West Mercia

Raising Awareness of Telephone callers pretending to be Police and from other official bodies.

West Mercia Police are continually urging people to be vigilant to Courier Fraud. Please remember police officers, and banks will never ask for account details or PINs over the phone. They also would not come around to your house to collect your cards or property.

West Mercia Police write “We would encourage anyone with elderly relatives or friends to talk to them about the Courier Fraud Scam, and make sure that they are aware – police officers, and banks will never ask for account details or PINs over the phone

  • If you receive a call by someone claiming to be a police officer asking for money, hang up immediately, wait 10 minutes and call 101 using another phone if possible. In an emergency or if a crime is in progress call 999.
  • In some instances telephone scammers have said that the amount taken from the bank is higher than the allowable amount. Be aware of what the maximum is that you can withdraw from your bank and see it as a warning sign if the caller states that more has been taken.
  • Banks, police officers and similar professionals will never contact members of the public to ask them to assist with investigations by ‘moving money to a safe account’ or similar activity such as buying items.
  • Fraudsters can seem to be highly credible, but if someone you don’t know contacts you out of the blue asking you to help with ‘an investigation’, be suspicious!
  • Older, less tech-savvy people often fall victim to courier fraud, please make older family members and friends aware of courier fraud – police officers, and banks will never ask for account details or PINs over the phone.
Shropshire Council 250-253

Shropshire Council Budget Consultation 2020

Shropshire Council has delivered savings of over £62m in the last four years to address reducing government funding for services and an increase in core service costs such as adult social care and children’s social care.

Shropshire Council says   “Further cuts on existing budget areas are becoming more and more difficult, so we’re looking at other ways to deliver income into the council to put us on a more sustainable funding position. We’d like your views on proposals being taken forward for the 2020/21 financial year so that we can take account of the taxpayers’ views on these proposals. But first, before we dive into the detail, it’s important that everyone understands some background information on our financial position.

We have two main types of funding, revenue funding and capital funding. Revenue funding consists of the revenue support grant, council tax, business rates, and other specific government grants and income, and these funds can be used towards the costs of maintaining day to day services including social care, waste collection and disposal, highways maintenance and cultural and leisure services.

Capital funding on the other hand includes capital grants, capital receipts from sales of assets, other contributions and borrowing. This funding can only be used for capital projects, not to support our day to day running budget.

The main pressure on our budgets is within the revenue budget, so we’re trying to think about how we can use the capital budget to develop some large-scale schemes that will deliver additional income or reduced costs. This should then relieve the pressure on the revenue budget and reduce the pressure on delivering further savings in service areas.

In terms of funding, the main area we have control over is setting the council tax level for the next year. For 2020/21 Shropshire Council we’re proposing a 1.99% increase to council tax in addition to a 2% increase that is used specifically for social care. This is the maximum that we can raise through council tax in this year.

We’re obliged to provide certain statutory services, such as provision of care for adults, children’s safeguarding and social care, waste collection and disposal and home-to-school transport for children aged 5-16. Whilst savings are delivered where possible within these services to make them as efficient and economical as possible, we must continue to provide these services and fund any increase in demand. These services make up a significant proportion of our budget.

The need to fund these services does increase the pressure on other areas we’re responsible for which are considered discretionary, so we’re looking to find other ways of bringing new or additional income in so that these discretionary services can be maintained where possible. This may be through capital investments, through new income opportunities by selling our services to partner organisations or through joint commissioning of services to deliver efficiencies between us and other public sector organisations. We look for these opportunities before considering cuts in services, but sometimes it’s necessary for services to be cut where the budget is too tight.

We’re planning to deliver savings of £20.9m in 2020/21, consisting of £14m of new savings proposals in addition to £6.9m which had been agreed for 2020/21 in the previous year’s financial strategies. The financial strategy for 2020/21 was presented to cabinet on 16 December for consideration.

These savings aren’t sufficient to close the full funding gap that we have in 2020/21, and we plan to use one-off grants from central government to balance the books. The funding for local government is anticipated to change in 2021/22 and it’s unlikely that these one-off grants will be continued in their current form, nor can we be sure that we’ll receive the total value of funding from central government. Further detail is expected on this over the spring/summer of 2020, and so further work will be performed on future years budgets at that point.

Shropshire Council has delivered savings of over £62m in the last four years to address reducing government funding for services and an increase in core service costs such as adult social care and children’s social care.

Whilst this has enabled us to deliver balanced budgets each year, further work is still required to deliver more savings as government grants continue to reduce in future years.

Further cuts on existing budget areas are becoming more and more difficult, so we’re looking at other ways to deliver income into the council to put us on a more sustainable funding position. We’d like your views on proposals being taken forward for the 2020/21 financial year so that we can take account of the taxpayers’ views on these proposals. But first, before we dive into the detail, it’s important that everyone understands some background information on our financial position.

We have two main types of funding, revenue funding and capital funding. Revenue funding consists of the revenue support grant, council tax, business rates, and other specific government grants and income, and these funds can be used towards the costs of maintaining day to day services including social care, waste collection and disposal, highways maintenance and cultural and leisure services.

Capital funding on the other hand includes capital grants, capital receipts from sales of assets, other contributions and borrowing. This funding can only be used for capital projects, not to support our day to day running budget.

The main pressure on our budgets is within the revenue budget, so we’re trying to think about how we can use the capital budget to develop some large-scale schemes that will deliver additional income or reduced costs. This should then relieve the pressure on the revenue budget and reduce the pressure on delivering further savings in service areas.

In terms of funding, the main area we have control over is setting the council tax level for the next year. For 2020/21 Shropshire Council we’re proposing a 1.99% increase to council tax in addition to a 2% increase that is used specifically for social care. This is the maximum that we can raise through council tax in this year.

We’re obliged to provide certain statutory services, such as provision of care for adults, children’s safeguarding and social care, waste collection and disposal and home-to-school transport for children aged 5-16. Whilst savings are delivered where possible within these services to make them as efficient and economical as possible, we must continue to provide these services and fund any increase in demand. These services make up a significant proportion of our budget.

The need to fund these services does increase the pressure on other areas we’re responsible for which are considered discretionary, so we’re looking to find other ways of bringing new or additional income in so that these discretionary services can be maintained where possible. This may be through capital investments, through new income opportunities by selling our services to partner organisations or through joint commissioning of services to deliver efficiencies between us and other public sector organisations. We look for these opportunities before considering cuts in services, but sometimes it’s necessary for services to be cut where the budget is too tight.

We’re planning to deliver savings of £20.9m in 2020/21, consisting of £14m of new savings proposals in addition to £6.9m which had been agreed for 2020/21 in the previous year’s financial strategies. The financial strategy for 2020/21 was presented to cabinet on 16 December for consideration.

These savings aren’t sufficient to close the full funding gap that we have in 2020/21, and we plan to use one-off grants from central government to balance the books. The funding for local government is anticipated to change in 2021/22 and it’s unlikely that these one-off grants will be continued in their current form, nor can we be sure that we’ll receive the total value of funding from central government. Further detail is expected on this over the spring/summer of 2020, and so further work will be performed on future years budgets at that point.

We want your help in confirming that our budget plans are appropriate in terms of the council tax rises proposed and the headline savings suggested. To have your say, simply click on the ‘How to get involved’ tab on this page to access a quick survey. The closing date for comments to be received by us is Tuesday 18 February”.

Your thoughts will be considered by full council when they discuss and agree on the final budget on Thursday 27 February 2020.

How to take part in this consultation:  https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/SCbudgetconsultation2020

If you don’t want to use the online submission option above, you can give us your views by email or letter:

Email: [email protected]

Write to: Budget Consultation, Feedback and Insight Team 1L32, Shropshire Council, Abbey Foregate, Shrewsbury, Shropshire SY2 6ND

Your views will form part of a report which will be considered by full council when they discuss and agree on the final budget on Thursday 27 February 2020.

Shrewsbury University 250-253

Psychology of Hate Event-23rd January 2020

On Thursday 23rd January 2020, 7 pm at the University Centre Shrewsbury, Guildhall, Shrewsbury SY3 8HQ, in room SGH201 this an event titled “Psychology of Hate” will take place. Places are free, but you are advised to book in advance. 

Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Social Psychology Rupert Brown of the University of Sussex will discuss “The Psychology of Hate.” Prof Brown is a co-founder of the Sussex Hate Crime Project which investigated the indirect effects of hate crimes over five years and in 20 studies with 4000 participants. The project examined the thoughts, emotions and behaviours of members of the affected community. By understanding the types of emotions that hate incidents typically give rise to, and how each of these emotions predict certain behavioural and attitudinal responses, the project has important implications for the ways in which policy makers and the community respond to hate crime.

Further details can also be found hereand you can book your place at this link :  https://www.ucshrewsbury.ac.uk/events/psychology-hate?list=987

Click here for flyer: Hate Event Flyer PRINT Booking a place is advisable.

Sunflower Lanyard

The Hidden Disabilities Sunflower

The Hidden Disabilities Sunflower was first launched at Gatwick Airport in May 2016. It is starting to be recognised globally and has been adopted in the UK by all of the major airports, many supermarkets, railway stations, leisure facilities, in the NHS and an increasing number of small and large businesses and organisations. Basically, it is used anywhere where people meet. 

How it all began: The Hidden Disabilities Sunflower originated in 2016 when London Gatwick Airport asked “How can we recognise that one of our passengers may have a non-obvious disability?”. The answer was to create a lanyard with a simple sunflower design on a green background. It was intended to be a subtle but visible sign enabling airport staff to recognise that the wearer (or someone with them) may require some extra help, time or assistance when moving through the airport.

Why the sunflower? 

Living with a Hidden Disabilities can make daily life more demanding for many people, but it can be difficult for others to recognise, acknowledge or understand the challenges faced. The Hidden Disabilities Sunflower suggests happinesspositivity and strength and intends to allow everyone with a Hidden Disabilities to choose to be subtly visible when they need to be. It is a universally recognised flower and is gender neutral.

The design is a bright yellow sunflower placed on a green background so that it is clearly visible from a distance.

Next time you shop, remember to ask for your Sunflower lanyard at Customer Services in Sainsbury’s, Argos or Marks and Spencers.

Sunflower Lanyard

 

Through the doorway 250-253

Through the Doorway, Spring programme

Through the Doorway, have four courses starting later this month and February 2020. If you would like the opportunity to try something new, increase your confidence and are unemployed (not in work but looking for work) or economically inactive (not in work and not currently looking for work) but want to become more active in your community in the future, you can book on one of the courses below. You must also have the right to live and work in the UK.

For more information about each course, download the information at the PDF or Word links below:

Cooking 4 Life: Cooking for Life PDF or download as a word document Cooking for Life

Lino Printing: Lino Printing PDF or download as a word document Lino Printing

Art 4 Well-being: Art for Wellbeing PDF or download as a word document Art for Wellbeing

Be Good to Yourself: Be Good To Yourself PDF or download as a word document Be Good To Yourself

For more information please call or text 07528 700492 or email [email protected]

deaf&able 250-253

Coping with Deafness through Lip Reading

If you have or you know someone who has lost some or all of their hearing, this is the course for you. A friendly comfortable environment to help you or help your friends manage their deafness. Find out what you could be entitled to and discover you are NOT ALONE.

This 10 course will take place at Dawley British Legion Club, 20 Station Road, Dawley, Telford TF4 2NW from 2 pm-4 pm on the following dates:

  • Thursday January 23, January 30,
  • Thursday February 6, Thursday February 13, Thursday February 20, Thursday February 27,
  • Thursday March 5, Thursday March 12, Thursday March 26 and
  • Thursday April 2, 2020

Cost for 10 weeks is £60. Come and meet Hearing Dog HARLEY.

To book your place contact Deaf n Able by email [email protected]ahoo.com or call 01952 763578

Download a word document, giving full details. TELFORD 0120 (1)